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Signs and symptoms of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anaemia(IDA) in children:1,5

 

  • Feeling tired and weak
  • Decreased school performance
  • Slow cognitive and social development
  • Delay in physical growth
  • Poorer motor function
  • Difficulty maintaining body temperature
  • Decreased immune function
  • Glossitis (inflamed tongue)
  • Lower socio-emotional development

When these impairments occur at an early age, they may be irreversible1

Poor diet and health factors can increase risk of ID/IDA in all children1,6 Examples of risk factors for ID/IDA include:

  • Low birth weight6
  • Delayed cord clamping6
  • High cow’s milk intake6
  • Low intake of iron-rich complementary foods6
  • Low socioeconomic disadvantaged families6
  • Blood loss caused by chronic or recurrent infections1
  • Malabsorption (Coeliac disease)7

Choose Ferrimed® an iron treatment for infants and toddlers that tastes good8

FERRIMED® SYRUP

 

Each 5 ml contains 50 mg elemental iron as iron(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex

Suitable for:
  • Premature infants
  • Infants and children ≤ 12 years
  • Adults who cannot tolerate capsules or tablets

Schedule information:

S1 FERRIMED®  Syrup / H842 (Act 101 of 1965) / Each 5 ml contains 50 mg elemental iron as iron (III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex.

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Where to buy:

FERRIMED® is available at all leading pharmacies in a
formulation to suit your preference and your lifestyle.

For more information, please speak to your doctor or pharmacist. For full prescribing information refer to the Ferrimed® package insert.

References:

  1. World Health Organization. Iron Deficiency Anaemia. Assessment, Prevention, and Control. A guide for programme managers. [online] [cited 2011 May 10]. Available from URL:http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/maternal_perinatal_health/NHD_01_13/en/
  2. Zuffo CRK, Osório MM, Taconeli CA, Suely TS, da Silva BHC, Almeida CCB. Prevalence and risk factors of anemia in children. J Pediatr (Rio J). 2016;92(4):353-360.
  3. Scott SP, Chen-Edinboro LP, Caulfield LE, Murray-Kolb LE. The Impact of Anemia on Child Mortality: An Updated Review. Nutr 2014;6:5915-5932. doi:10.3390/nu6125915.
  4. Chandyo RK, Ulak M, Adhikari RK, Sommerfelt H, Strand TA. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and anemia among Young Children with Acute Diarrhea in Bhaktapur, Nepal. Healthcare (Basel) 2015;3:593-606.
  5. Alton I. Iron Deficiency Anemia. Guidelines for Adolescent Nutrition Services. Chapter 9. 2005 [online] [cited 2011 May 11]. Available from URL: http://www.epi.umn.edu/let/pubs/adol_book.shtm
  6. Domellöf M, Braegger C, Campoy C, Colomb V, Decsi T, Fewtrell M, et al. Iron Requirements of Infants and Toddlers. JPGN 2014;58(1):119-129.
  7. Short MW, Domagalski JE. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Evaluation and Management. Physician 2013;87(2):98-104.
  8. Ferrimed® Syrup Package Insert, 6 June 2003.
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