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Causes of iron deficiency (ID) include:

1

Lack of iron in the diet3,6

2

Blood loss3,6

3

Your body may not be able to absorb the iron from the food you eat3,6

6

Increased needs3,6

If you fall within any of these groups, you may be iron deficient.

WOMEN OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE

5
Menstruation

During each menstrual cycle you lose blood, which contains iron. If the amount of iron in your diet does not match what is lost, you could become iron deficient.3,6

6
Pregnancy

Iron deficiency is common during pregnancy as pregnant women have higher iron requirements for the growth of the placenta and a healthy baby.7

7
Post-partum

Iron deficiency is common after giving birth due to blood loss at delivery.7,8

PEOPLE LIVING
ACTIVE LIFESTYLES

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Iron is important for energy production and carrying oxygen to your muscles. If you have insufficient iron stores it will impact your well-being and athletic performance.9

Long-term strenuous exercise places you at an increased risk of depleting your iron stores.9

LACK OF
IRON IN DIET

8

Your body gets the iron it needs from the food you eat. Iron-enriched foods include meat, eggs and leafy green vegetables and iron-fortified foods. If you follow a restricted vegetarian diet, you may have a greater risk of iron deficiency.3

If you experience any of the following signs and symptoms you may be suffering from iron deficiency (ID)

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Tiredness3,4

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Decreased exercise performance10,11

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Poor concentration, irritability4,11,12

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Decreased work capacity 4,12

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Unusual cravings for non-food items such as dirt and ice3,10

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Hair loss4

Unsure of your signs and symptoms go to the Symptom checker to find out

FERRIMED®
D.S Chewable tablet

Sugar free 100 mg elemental iron as iron
(III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex

Suitable for:
  • Men
  • Post-menopausal women
  • Menstruating women
  • Endurance athletes
  • Adolescents
  • Vegetarians
  • Diabetics
  • Halaal certified

Schedule information:

S1 FERRIMED®  D.S. Chewable Tablets / L/8.3/201 / Each tablet contains 100 mg elemental iron as iron (III)-hydroxide polymaltose complex.

FERR20971_Chewables

Where to buy:

FERRIMED® is available at all leading pharmacies in a
formulation to suit your preference and your lifestyle.

For more information, please speak to your doctor or pharmacist. For full prescribing information refer to the Ferrimed® package insert.

References:

  1. Phatlhane DV, Zemlin AE, Matsha TE, Hoffman M, Naidoo N, Ichihara K, et al. The iron status of a healthy South African adult population. Clinica Chimica Acta 2016;460:240-245.
  2. The Problem: about iron deficiency. [Online] [cited 2018 Feb 19]. Available from: URL: https://www.unicef.org/nutrition/23964_iron.html.
  3. Mayo Clinic. Iron deficiency anemia. [Online] 2016 Nov 11 [cited 2018 Feb 19]. Available from: URL: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/iron-deficiency-anemia/symptoms-causes/syc-20355034.
  4. Auerbach M, Adamson JW. How we diagnose and treat iron deficiency anemia. Am J Hematol 2016;91(1):31-38.
  5. Pourcelot E, Lénon M, Mobilia N, Cahn J-Y, Arnaud J, Fanchon E, et al. Iron for proliferation of cell lines and hematopoietic progenitors: Nailing down the intracellular functional iron concentration. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 2015:1853;1596–
  6. Abbaspour N, Hurrell R, Kelishadi R. Review on iron and its importance for human health. J Res Med Sci 2014;19(2):164-174.
  7. Breymann C. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Expert Rev Obstet Gynecol 2013;8(6):587-596.
  8. Milman N. Postpartum anemia I: definition, prevalence, causes, and consequences. Ann Hematol 2011;90:1247–
  9. Peeling P, Dawson B, Goodman C, Landers G, Trinder D. Athletic induced iron deficiency: new insights into the role of imflammation, cytokines and hormones. Eur J Appl Physiol 2008;103:381-391.
  10. Beard JL. Iron Biology in Immune Function, Muscle Metabolism and Neuronal Functioning. J Nutr 2001;131:568S-580S.
  11. Kodura P, Abraham BP. The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease. Ther Adv Gastroenterol 2016;9(1):76-85.
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